Camera Mode: DANGER IN THE DARK Hits the Streets

With only days to go before the first preview of the Baxter Theatre Centre‘s Danger in the Dark, the company took to the streets of Cape Town for a photographic feature by Jesse Kramer. The production is a new adaptation of Poison, the 1992 musical written by David Kramer and Taliep Petersen, which Kramer himself has reinvented.

Elton Landrew, Eldon van der Merwe, Loukmaan Adams, Alexis Petersen, Rushney Ferguson, Edith Plaatjies, Chad Baai and Tashreeq de Villiers in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Elton Landrew, Eldon van der Merwe, Loukmaan Adams, Alexis Petersen, Rushney Ferguson, Edith Plaatjies, Chad Baai and Tashreeq de Villiers in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Chad Baai, Elton Landrew, Rushney Ferguson, Loukmaan Adams, Alexis Petersen, Tashreeq de Villiers, Edith Plaatjies and Eldon van der Merwe in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Chad Baai, Elton Landrew, Rushney Ferguson, Loukmaan Adams, Alexis Petersen, Tashreeq de Villiers, Edith Plaatjies and Eldon van der Merwe in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)

Made possible by the City of Cape Town, Danger in the Dark is a timely response to the critical social issues that plague communities all over the Western Cape. Set in the underbelly of the Cape Flats, the musical unfolds in 1995, when Pamela (played by Alexis Petersen), a social worker who is writing a thesis on drug abuse, meets up with Juanita (Rushney Ferguson), a friend from her school days. When she realises that Juanita is trapped in an abusive relationship with a drug lord, she finds herself drawn into dark and dangerous places and situations as she tried to help her friend escape.

With Kramer at the helm of the production, Camillo Lombard takes up the duties of musical director with Grant van Ster and Shaun Oelf choreographing the show. A 22-strong South African cast and a live band bring to life the painfully beautiful narrative and soaring music.

Bookings are now open through Webtickets, with information about discounted block or schools’ bookings, fundraisers and charities available from Leon van Zyl. Ticket prices range from R100 to R195. The production previews at the Baxter Theatre from 11 – 14 October, opens on 15 October and runs until 2 November. There is an age restriction of 12 years.

Camera Mode: DANGER IN THE DARK in Rehearsal

It’s crunch time for the Baxter Theatre Centre‘s Danger in the Dark, David Kramer‘s new adaptation of Poison, the musical he created with Taliep Petersen in the early 1990s, with the first previews of the show scheduled for next weekend.

Made possible by the City of Cape Town, Danger in the Dark is a timely response to the critical social issues that plague communities all over the Western Cape. Set in the underbelly of the Cape Flats, the musical unfolds in 1995, when Pamela (played by Alexis Petersen), a social worker who is writing a thesis on drug abuse, meets up with Juanita (Rushney Ferguson), a friend from her school days. When she realises that Juanita is trapped in an abusive relationship with a drug lord, she finds herself drawn into dark and dangerous places and situations as she tried to help her friend escape.

Take a peek through Jesse Kramer’s lens into the rehearsal room, where Kramer is putting the finishing touches on the production, together with the assistant director for the production, Grant van Ster. Van Ster is also choreographing the show in collaborataion with Shaun Oelf. Camillo Lombard serves as musical director.

Chad Baai and Loukmaan Adams in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Chad Baai as Shawn confronts Loukmaan Adams as Michael in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Luke Buys, Lubabalo Pupu, Loreto Cabrera and Mekaila Mathys in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Ensemble members Luke Buys, Lubabalo Pupu, Loreto Cabrera and Mekaila Mathys in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Alex Rodkin, Luke Buys and Gabriela Dirkse in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)
Ensemble members Alex Rodkin, Luke Buys and Gabriela Dirkse in DANGER IN THE DARK (Photo credit: Jesse Kramer)

With a cast of 22 vibrant South African performers and a live band bringing to life the painfully beautiful narrative and soaring music of Danger in the Dark, this production promises to be a thrilling reinvention of the original Kramer-Petersen musical.

Bookings are now open through Webtickets, with information about discounted block or schools’ bookings, fundraisers and charities available from Leon van Zyl. Ticket prices range from R100 to R195. The production previews at the Baxter Theatre from 11 – 14 October, opens on 15 October and runs until 2 November. There is an age restriction of 12 years.

DANGER IN THE DARK Reworks Kramer and Petersen’s POISON

Final Poster for DANGER IN THE DARK

David Kramer’s Danger in the Dark, a reworking of the hit musical, Poison, which he and the legendary late Taliep Petersen wrote in the early 1990s and was produced by Renaye Kramer, will premiere at the Baxter Theatre Centre this October. Kramer has written a new book for Danger in the Dark, but he has retained many of the original songs.

Poison was very well received in South Africa, Malaysia and London. The original production premiered in 1992 under the auspices of CAPAB Opera and was first reworked in 1994 for a season produced by Volkswagen Musicactive. A production at the Port Elizabeth Opera House followed in 1995, with another revival, directed by Bobby Heaney, having been staged at the Baxter Theatre in 2004 as part of the Klipfontein Corridor Project.

In the current adaptation of this powerful musical, Kramer has decided to tell the story from the point of view of Pamela, a social worker who is writing her thesis on drug abuse on the Cape Flats. Considering the critical crisis plaguing communities all over the Western Cape, the timing of this production could not be more perfect.

Danger in the Dark unfolds in 1995, when Pamela meets up with Juanita, a friend from her school days. She soon realises that Juanita is trapped in an abusive relationship with a drug lord and she is desperate to help her friend escape. Pamela is drawn into dark and dangerous places and situations, yet she endures against all odds, for the safety and survival of her friend.

David Kramer

Directed by Kramer with assistant director Grant van Ster, the acclaimed creative team for Danger in the Dark is made up of Camillo Lombard (musical director), Patrick Curtis (set and lighting designer), David Classen (sound designer), Widaad Albertus (costume designer), Kirsti Cummings (videographer) and Shaun Oelf and Grant van Ster (choreography).

Kramer has assembled a stellar cast of eight lead performers with a chorus of 14, who dance, sing and play a variety of roles, accompanied by a live band of five musicians.

The cast is led by Alexis Petersen as Pamela, Rushney Ferguson as Juanita, Elton Landrew as Poison, Eldon van der Merwe as Chicco, Tashreeq de Villiers as Lucky, Edith Plaatjies as Mrs Joseph, Loukmaan Adams as Michael and Chad Baai as Shawn. The ensemble comprises Luke Buys, Loreto Cabrera, Lewellyn Afrika, Luke de Kock, Anzio September, Lubabalo Pupu, Rori York Bingham, Nadine Suliaman, Alex Rodkin, Chamonay Anthony, Mekaila Mathys, Crystal Finck, Gabriela Dirkse and Tanzley Jooste.

Grandall Vlotman (conductor and keyboards), Shaun Francke (guitar), Jason Ward (drums and percussion), Yvan Potts (synthesizers) and Kurt Randall (bassist) make up the band.

Made possible by the City of Cape Town, Danger in the Dark previews at the Baxter Theatre from 11 – 14 October, opens on 15 October and runs until 2 November. Ticket prices range from R100 to R195 and booking is now open through Webtickets. For discounted block or schools’ bookings, fundraisers and charities, contact Leon van Zyl. There is an age restriction of 12 years.

Classy Makeover for Simon and Garfunkel in HERE’S TO YOU

Fall in love with Simon and Garfunkel all over again in Here’s to You, a dynamic and uplifting musical journey through more than twenty classic hits! Expect to hear all the hits, including “Bridge Over Troubled Water,” “The Sound of Silence,” “Scarborough Fair,” “Mrs Robinson,” and “Graceland.”

Under the direction of Timothy le Roux, the show features thrillingly fresh yet faithful interpretations of Simon and Garfunkel’s evergreen songs, blending nostalgia and imagination, so that different generations, young and old, can discover the magic of the duo’s folk-rock music as if for the very first time.

Here’s to You is performed by a stellar all-South African cast of eight talented singers who all play musical instruments. Under the musical direction of Wessel Odendaal, the cast is lead by Josh Ansley on guitar with Ashleigh Butcher on banjo, guitar and ukelele, Daniel Geddes on keyboards, Hanna So on piano, violin and cello, Justin Swartz on guitar and vocal percussion, Phindile Dube on percussion and Sanli Jooste on cello.

The production runs at Pieter Toerien’s Montecasino Theatre from 5 – 28 July 2019, with performances at 20:00 from Wednesdays to Saturdays, as well as at 16:00 on Saturdays and 15:00 on Sundays. Tickets are available from R100 through Computicket.

Richard O’Brien’s ROCKY HORROR SHOW Set to Do the Time Warp Again on SA Stages from December

Rocky Horror 2018Pieter Toerien and Howard Panter will present a new production of Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Show on South African stages, with seasons of the legendary musical extravaganza set to play the Artscape Opera House in Cape Town from 6 December 2019 – 12 January 2020 and the Teatro at Montecasino in Johannesburg from 17 January – 1 March.

The Rocky Horror Show tells the story of Brad and his fiancée, Janet, two squeaky clean college kids who meet Dr Frank’n’Furter by chance when their car breaks down outside his house whilst on their way to visit their favourite college professor. It’s an adventure they’ll never forget, with fun, frolics, frocks and frivolity, bursting with timeless songs and outrageous outfits. The Rocky Horror Show is a guaranteed party, which famously combines science-fiction, horror, comedy and music while encouraging audience participation meaning, of course, getting dressed in the most outrageous fancy dress.

Directed by Christopher Luscombe, the smash hit show features all of the famous musical numbers which have made The Rocky Horror Show such a huge hit for over four decades, including “Sweet Transvestite”, “Science Fiction/Double Feature”, “Dammit Janet” and, of course, the timeless floor-filler, “The Time-Warp.”

The local cast stars Craig Urbani as Dr Frank’n’Furter and Kate Normington as the Narrator, with Anthony Downing, Marlee van der Merwe, Stefania du Toit, Zac Hendrikz, Jarryd Nurden, Jessica Sole, Usisipho Nteyi, Robin Timm and Sean Louw completing the company.

The Rocky Horror Show first began life in 1973 before an audience of just 63 people in the Royal Court’s Theatre Upstairs. It was an immediate success and transferred to the Chelsea Classic Cinema, before going on to run at the Kings Road Theatre from 1973 – 1979 and the Comedy Theatre in the West End from 1979 – 1980. In 1975, it was transformed into a film called The Rocky Horror Picture Show. This film adaptation took over $135 million at the box office and is still shown in cinemas around the world more than 40 years after its premiere. The stage show itself has been performed worldwide in more than 30 countries and has been translated into over 20 languages.

Ready to thrill you with fun and naughty moments, The Rocky Horror Show is the boldest bash of them all. Promising to be bigger and better than any production ever seen before on South African stages, The Rocky Horror Show is sure to have local audiences waiting in actici… pation as opening night draws nearer. Bookings are through Computicket.

Afrikaans Cabaret PSALTER Headlines Musical Offerings at the Alexander Bar

PsalterLen-Barry Simons will be back on stage at the Alexander Bar in the Wessel Pretorius-scripted, Psalter, an Afrikaans cabaret that debuted at the intimate Mother City theatre venue last year.

Psalter takes its name from the book of Psalms and is a collection of growing-up memories of a Gaga worshiper, a disciple of Nina Simone and an envoy of the moon in kitsch angel wings. It is also an ode to three sisters, Greta, Joan and Bettie, each named after a silvery goddess, trying to cherish a child through the changing seasons. Christopher Petrie serves as the accompanist for the show, which runs from 4 – 8 June.

Also on offer at the venue for fans of local musical theatre performance are two burlesque revues, (Her)Story on 31 May and Fetish and Feathers on 14 June as well as a tribute show to Aretha Franklin from 4 Tons of Fun on 1 June.

Bookings for all of these productions can be made online at The Alexander Bar, Café and Theatre’s website. As usual, tickets bought online are on sale at a discounted price.

LAMTA Students to Dance the Night Away in SILVER SCREEN

Silver ScreenThe Luitingh Alexander Musical Theatre Academy – or LAMTA, as it is fondly known – is delighted to announce its first stage production at Theatre on the Bay. Silver Screen is inspired by music from some of cinema’s most timeless classics and modern blockbusters and serves as a showcase of South Africa’s freshest young talent.

Choreographed by established leaders in the South African dance industry – including Adele Blank, Brigitte Reeve, Hope Maimane, Michelle Reid, Duane Alexander, Ilona Frege, Ashley Searle, Robin van Wyk and Sven-Eric Müller – this production promises to be a celebration of powerful and exciting dance to some of your favourite movie music hits.

The Luitingh Alexander Musical Theatre Academy was recently established on the top floor of Theatre on the Bay in Camps Bay with the primary aim of training triple threat students to become competitive working artists in today’s theatre industry. LAMTA is a partnership between musical theatre performers Anton Luitingh and Duane Alexander and theatre impresario, Pieter Toerien.

Tickets for Silver Screen, which runs from 5 – 8 June, cost R100 and are available through Computicket.

Musical Theatre Nominees to Hit the High Notes at 54th Fleur du Cap Theatre Awards

LANGARM Poster

With two weeks to go until the curtain rises on the 54th Fleur du Cap Theatre Awards at the Artscape Opera House, it is time for the South African Theatre Archive to offer its congratulations to the musical theatre nominees that hit the high notes in several categories awarded by the awards programme for their work in 2019. The Fleur du Cap Theatre awards are regarded amongst the most valued and prestigious in the South African performing arts industry.

The Fleur du Cap Theatre Awards are sponsored by the Fleur du Cap wine brand. At inception in 1965, the awards were known as the Three Leaf Awards, becoming the Fleur du Cap Theatre Awards in 1978 to celebrate one of Distell’s leading wine brands. The panel of judges, chaired by a non-voting chairperson, is made up largely of local critics, journalists, writers and drama educators and comprises Africa Melane, Dr Beverley Brommert, Eugene Yiga, Lwando Scott, Marina Griebenow, Maurice Carpede, Peggy Mongoato, Tracey Saunders and Dr Wayne Muller.

Nominees and winners are chosen from productions performed at professional theatre venues in and around Cape Town. Theatre practitioners are recognised for acting, directing, staging and technical ability. For musical theatre productions and opera, the casts on opening night are considered. The full list of nominees per category is available on the Fleur du Cape website.

Matilda

The outstanding production of Matilda the Musical (produced by Pieter Toerien Productions and GWB Entertainment) earned a nomination for Best Production, alongside Endgame, Curse of the Starving Class, Kudu and Womb of Fire. The production collected a further ten nominations, including three in the category of Best Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show: Bethany Dickson, who offered a masterclass in emotion as Miss Honey; Claire Taylor, who played the deliciously dreadful Mrs Wormwood with style; and Nompumelelo Mayiyane, whose presence as the endearing librarian, Mrs Phelps, left a lasting impression on local audiences.

Further acting nominations were garnered by Cameron Seear (Best Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show) as Bruce Bogtrotter, the character that kicks off one of the flagship numbers of the show, “Revolting Children,” as well as Ryan de Villiers (Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show) for his astounding musical theatre debut as Miss Trunchbull and Kitty Harris (Best Performance by a Lead Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show) for her memorable turn as Matilda.

In the design categories, nods were given to Rob Howell (Best Costume Design and Best Set Design), Simon Baker (Best Sound Design) and Hugh Vanstone (Best Lighting Design).

Original South African works also earned their fair share of nominations, with Tsotsi the Musical receiving eight nominations, and Calling Us Home and Langarm three apiece. The lack of writing nominations for any of these new productions perhaps reflects the long journey ahead for local musical theatre pieces before they can hold their own as dramatic works in the South African theatre landscape.

Tsotsi the Musical, however, already has one award in the bag, with Janni Younge and Craig Leo having earned the single nomination in the Best Puppetry Design category. The strongly designed production will also compete for Best Costume Design (Noluthando Lobese Moropa), Best Sound Design (Marcel Bezuidenhout) and Best Set Design (Michael Mitchell and Neil Coppen). The balance of the nominations were for Kgomotso Matsunyane as Miriam and Thembisile Ntaka as Adedola (both for Best Performance by a Supporting Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show), Msizi Njapha as Boston (for Best Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show) and Mxolisi (Zuluboy) Majozi as Tsotsi (for Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show).

Calling Us Home

The best hope for Calling Us Home winning an award is the luminous Lynelle Kenned (Best Performance by a Lead Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show), who played Grace in this second iteration of the production that debuted as Calling Me Home in Johannesburg. Conroy Scott (who played Ivan) and Musanete Sakupwanya (who played Nelson) received nominations for Best Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show and Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show respectively.

The strongest contender from Langarm is Elton Landrew, the sole nominee from the show in the Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show category. His nuanced performance as Eddie mined David Kramer’s script and score for both comedy and pathos. In the category for Best Performance by a Lead Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show, Kim Louis, who played Dinah and returned to the professional stage following two decades out of the spotlight, will go head-to-head against Rushney Ferguson, who stepped into her first leading lady role as Angelina in the production.

West Side Story 2015-2018

Earning nominations as replacements in returning productions were Carmen Pretorius, as Maria in The Sound of Music, for Best Performance by a Lead Actress in a Musical or Music Theatre Show; Kevin Hack as Tony in West Side Story, for Best Performance by a Lead Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show. Dueling it out in the category for Best Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Musical or Music Theatre Show will be Daniel Mpilo Richards as Bernardo in West Side Story and Desmond Dube as Pop in King Kong.

A further musical theatre production, Fred Abrahamse and Marcel Meyer’s Alice in Wonderland, has been nominated in the category for Best Theatre Production for Children and Young People.

This year’s ceremony will take place on Sunday, 10 March at 17:30, promising to offer an evening celebrating Vintage theatre and wines. Mbongeni N. Mtshali will direct the ceremony, with José Dias serving as musical director. Africa Melane, returns to host the evening with a variety of co-presenters who have been recipients of the Innovation in Theatre and Encore Awards in the past decade. Winners are chosen from productions performed at professional theatre venues in and around Cape Town. The winners of the Lifetime Achievement and Innovation in Theatre awards will also be named at the ceremony.

Tickets for the ceremony are available at R250 per person. Bookings can be made at online at Computicket, by phone on 0861 915 8000, or in person at any Shoprite Checkers outlet as well as the Artscape Box Office on 021 410 9838 and Dial-a-Seat on 021 421 7695.

Time to go INTO THE WOODS at Theatre on the Bay

PInto the Woodsieter Toerien Productions and KickstArt Theatre will present James Lapine and Stephen Sondheim’s Into the Woods at Theatre on the Bay, starting 30 January. Proclaimed as a sleek and sexy beast of a musical, Into the Woods is by turns moody, magical, witty and wise, and promises to offer the exhilarating theatrical experience that audiences have come to expect from Sondheim, the co-creator of musical masterpieces such as Sweeney Todd and West Side Story.

Into the Woods follows the trials and adventures of a baker (Earl Gregory) and his wife (Jessica Sole), whose paths cross with a witch (Kate Normington) and a host of of well-known fairy-tale characters, including Cinderella (Haylea Heyns), Rapunzel (LJ Neilson), Jack (Graham Wicks) and Little Red Riding Hood (Megan Rigby) as they all go into the deep and dark woods on separate quests that intersect with sometimes amusing, sometimes alarming results.

But Into the Woods is no children’s tale. The musical is is a wicked and wonderful cautionary fairy tale for adults that will delight and haunt audiences as it explores what it means to be human, to long for something other, to wish for something more than what you have, and to deal with the inevitable loss and the terrible beauty that this journey through the world offers us.

The show features a dazzling score, with ravishing melodies and seductive rhythms. Boasting one of the cleverest and most complex set of lyrics ever written for musical theatre, this is Sondheim at his very best, offering South African audiences a very rare opportunity to revel in his wisdom and originality.

Directed by Steven Stead and designed by Greg King, the production will have musical  supervision by Drew Rienstra, costume design by Neil Harris and lighting design by Tina le Roux. The company is rounded out by  Dianne Simpson as Cinderella’s Stepmother and Granny, Sarah Richard as Florinda, Ashleigh Harvey as Lucinda, Candice Van Litsenborgh as Jack’s Mother, Zak Hendricks as The Wolf and Cinderella’s Prince, as Rapunzel, Nathan Kruger as Rapunzel’s Prince, Schoeman Smit as The Steward and Michael Richard as The Narrator and The Mysterious Man.

Into the Woods is booking through 2 March, with tickets ranging in price from R175 – R375 available at Computicket. Providing both intellectual and emotional satisfaction, Into the Woods has all the allure of the fairy tale. Both mysterious and whimsical, it tells of love, loss, desire, hope – and revenge. Although its roots are deeply planted in old folk tales, Into the Woods offers a rich harvest of ideas – the kind of production that appears only once in a blue moon.

Flagship NAF Musical Productions for 2019 On Sale

Brett BaileyFor the first time ever, audiences will have the chance in December to snap up early tickets to some of the flagship productions at the 2019 National Arts Festival in Makhanda, which will be held from 27 June to 7 July next year. Two of these have connections to the musical theatre scene, a new production by Brett Bailey and a programme to be performed by the Drakensberg Boys Choir.

Brett Bailey’s new work, Samson, promises to be a highly theatrical, visual and musical work with a sharp political sensibility. The piece markets itself as a lyrical, sharp-edged, apocalyptic dance-music-theatre piece, based on the popular Old Testament hero myth of loss, betrayal and rage, and interpreted on a rich visual canvas, with haunting choreography, soaring vocals and live electronica. It is set in a dystopian present in which a rapacious and supremacist master race feeds off the labour of the downtrodden masses.

Performed with opera, choral singing, punchy animated video scenography, black humour, brooding swagger and the booming sub-bass of dub-step music, Samson is a young man with a heroic mission in an era of intolerance and polarisation. Channelling the fury of his oppressed people, he inflicts terror on the population that he holds accountable for their subjugation. As the body count mounts and war surges, Delilah – an ambivalent enemy agent – seduces and ritually castrates him. His brutal punishment in the detention facilities of the authorities spurs him to an act of suicidal devastation.

The internationally acclaimed works of Brett Bailey and Third World Bunfight often have a strong musical element to them. These include productions such as Ipi Zombi? and MedEia as well as a re-interpretation of the Giuseppe Verdi composed opera, Macbeth. Samson, which will head abroad following its season on the main festival, also features three Standard Bank Young Artist alumni: choreographer Vincent Mantsoe (Dance, 1996), Shane Cooper (Jazz, 2013) and Bailey himself (Theatre, 2001). This a fortunate stroke of serendipity is a fitting in a year that celebrates 35 years of Standard Bank’s sponsorship of these awards. Cooper will is create the score for Samson.

Drakensburg Boys ChoirThe internationally renowned yet proudly local Drakensberg Boys Choir will perform a selection of classical, African Gospel and choral pop music. This will be followed by their unique, semi-theatrical presentation of indigenous South African music, which centres around the theme of Water=Life, as well as their renditions of chart-topping pop songs and gospel numbers. The choir will incorporate songs and music from Xhamissa into their single-set programme as a concertante version.

The choir is a unique institution with a 51-year history, the calibre of their old boys speaking for itself. One alumnus, Terence Bridgett, has made several appearances in local musical theatre productions, playing the Pharoah in Joseph and the Amazing Technicolour Dreamcoat, the Fox in Pinocchio, and Herod in Jesus Christ Superstar, also performing in Saturday Night Fever. Another former chorister, Dawid Boverhoff, has found himself in the role of musical director for shows like Heidi and Avenue Q.

Only one performance per show is available for early bookings: 27 June at 16:00 for Samson and 1 July at 18:00 for the Drakensberg Boys Choir Live in ConcertAll other shows in these respective seasons will open for full bookings early in 2019. An excellent Christmas present or “just because”, these early bookings are a great reason to get planning for the 2019 National Arts Festival. For a bit of help with these plans, the National Arts Festival website has comprehensive information on how to get there and where to stay.